Lincoln Cent Struck on wrong planchet – A pair of 1945 Lincoln Cents on Ethiopian planchets.

Struck on wrong planchet - 1945 Lincoln Cent struck on an Ethiopian planchet.

Attribution of 1945 Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet. This is one way to tell if you have a Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet.

A customer came up to our table at the Weyer’s Cave, Virginia coin show and had a few coins that he would like to know if the information provided on the labels was correct. He said he’d like closure on the matter and wondered if I would help him research the coin to see if these Lincoln Cents – yes, that is plural – he has two of the struck on wrong planchet Lincoln Cents that may have been struck on Ethiopian planchets.

One of these amazing coins is up for auction ! Check out the link below :

https://auctions.stacksbowers.com/lots/view/3-VKYHT/1945-lincoln-cent-struck-on-an-ethiopia-5-centimes-planchet-ms-64-rb-ngc

I told the customer that I would research the coins as soon as I could. With my Weyer’s Cave coin show bucket list almost complete – including finding a few 2009 Jefferson Nickels for another client, I thought I would share the struck on wrong planchet attribution process with everyone.

The only photo I took of the coins was quick and at the time was not planning on using the photos for a Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet post but, the more I thought about it, the better the idea became.

Let’s dive in to the attribution.

First thing we get to see is specifics about the potential struck on wrong planchet coin. What do we know about it?

Information about the Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet

This Lincoln Cent was struck in 1945, probably in Philadelphia.

The weight of the coin is 4.0 grams and 4.1 grams, respectively.

Even if we did NOT have the label information, BUT had the coin and the weight, it is a place to start.

Struck on wrong planchet label #1 - 1945 Lincoln Cent struck on an Ethiopian planchet.
Struck on wrong planchet label #1 – 1945 Lincoln Cent struck on an Ethiopian planchet.
Struck on wrong planchet label #2 - 1945 Lincoln Cent struck on an Ethiopian planchet.
Struck on wrong planchet label #2 – 1945 Lincoln Cent struck on an Ethiopian planchet.

We need to know what a 1945 Lincoln Cent actually weighs.

So after a little research, we see the following information:

Copper Lincoln Cents

Dates: Between 1944-1946 and 1962-1982
Composition: 95% copper, 5% zinc
Weight: 3.11 grams
Diameter: 19 mm

So, we know the following information so far:

1945 Lincoln Cent weight: 3.11 grams

Lincoln Cent Struck on wrong planchet candidate: 4.0 and 4.1 grams

The struck on wrong planchet candidate is definitely out of the US Mint tolerance range.

We aren’t able to use a caliper to see the exact size of the Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet candidate, but, by the appearance, the coin looks like it is about the same size. One other thing we might have been able to do is to see if the Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet candidates were a little bit thicker. IF they were not slabbed you could simply lay a raw normal Lincoln Cent right next to a raw Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet candidate, and see if they are about the same thickness.

Amplifying information !

The customer did break out one of the Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet candidate coins and submitted it to PCGS. My point for this tidbit of information will help a bit in the Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet attribution. Let’s see what the PCGS label says:

Struck on wrong planchet label #3 - 1945 Lincoln Cent struck on an Ethiopian planchet.
Struck on wrong planchet label #3 – 1945 Lincoln Cent struck on an Ethiopian planchet.

Aha ! We see that the Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet candidate on the PCGS label does not give the amplification information about the Ethiopian planchet BUT, it does offer “struck on thick planchet”. That means more than likely these Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet candidates would be a little thicker than a typical Lincoln Cent minted in 1945.

More Amplifying information !

In order to be more correct, a magnet should have been placed close to the slabbed Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet candidates. Why? To see if the Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet candidates had any metal within them that might be magnetic.

WARNING ! Magnets can damage raw coins. Use care when using them, and only use a magnet that is just powerful enough to do the test.

Normal copper based Lincoln Cents are non-magnetic, but there are plenty of other planchets used in the world that are. It is one more check mark to make sure the attribution process is solid.

Did the US Mint foreign coins in 1945?

In order for Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchets to exist, the US Mint had to manufacture some other planchets that were not used to make US Coins. Did the US Mint produce any foreign coins in 1945, and if so, which ones? Remember, we need to focus on coins that appear to be copper.

OK, we need to go to the following website that offers a spreadsheet of known foreign coins minted by the US Mint. PLEASE NOTE! This may not be an “official document”, but it is used by many experts and they have not questioned the information:

https://minterrornews.com/foreign_coinage_production_figures.pdf

The Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet candidate list

Going through the above list, I see the following possibilities. I am listing them as I see them, and then will check specs and see if they are a fit later.

El Salvador 1945 P 1 Centavo 95% copper 5% zinc 2.50000 grams 16.000mm (Page 16)

Ethiopia 1945 P 1936 Amharic Plain edge. 25 Centimes 95% copper, 5% zinc 6.80000 grams / 26.000mm (Page 17)

Ethiopia 1945 P 1936 Amharic 10 Centimes 95% copper, 5% zinc 6.10000grams / 23.000mm (Page 17)

Ethiopia 1945 P 1936 Amharic 5 Centimes 95% copper, 5% zinc 4.00000 grams / 20.000 mm (Page 17)

Ethiopia 1945 P 1936 Amharic 1 Centime 95% copper, 5% zinc 2.85000 grams / 17.000mm (Page 17)

Netherlands – East Indies 1945 P 2 1/2 Centstukken 95% copper, 5% zinc 12.50000 grams / 31.000mm (Page 29)

Netherlands – East Indies 1945 P 1 Centstukken 95% copper, 5% zinc 4.00000 grams / 23.500mm (Page 29) NOTE: Coin has a central hole measuring 5.2 millimeters in diameter.

Netherlands – East Indies 1945 D 1 Centstukken 95% copper, 5% zinc 4.00000 grams / 23.500mm (Page 29) NOTE: Coin has a central hole measuring 5.2 millimeters in diameter. Denver Mint.

Netherlands – East Indies 1945 S 1 Centstukken 95% copper, 5% zinc 4.00000 grams / 23.500mm (Page 29) NOTE: Coin has a central hole measuring 5.2 millimeters in diameter. San Francisco Mint.

Netherlands – East Indies 1945 P Half Centstukken 95% copper, 5% zinc 2.30000 grams / 17.000mm (Page 29)

Peru 1945 P 50 Centavos 70% copper, 30% zinc 7.50000 grams / 27.000mm (Page 41)

Philippines 1945 S 1945 5 Centavos 5 72,796,000 75% copper, 25% nickel Y30A 5.00000 21.000 (Page 45)

Philippines 1945 S 1944 1 Centavo 95% copper, 5% zinc, 1%tin 5.18400 grams / 25.000mm (Page 45)

And that appears to be the list. So, out of ALL the above listed Lincoln Cent struck on wrong planchet candidates, the BEST match is:

Ethiopia 1945 P 1936 Amharic 5 Centimes 95% copper, 5% zinc 4.00000 grams / 20.000 mm (Page 17)

So, where can we see a photo of the coin that SHOULD have been on this Ethiopian planchet?

Let us head over to:

https://numista.com

From there, It’s up to you to find a match.

JUST Kidding. Take a look at this coin:

https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces5946.html

Struck on wrong planchet Actual "normal" coin - 1945 Lincoln Cent struck on an Ethiopian planchet.
Struck on wrong planchet Actual “normal” coin – 1945 Lincoln Cent struck on an Ethiopian planchet.
Struck on wrong planchet Actual "normal" coin - 1945 Lincoln Cent struck on an Ethiopian planchet.
Struck on wrong planchet Actual “normal” coin – 1945 Lincoln Cent struck on an Ethiopian planchet.

The comment reads: Struck between 1944-1962 in Philadelphia, United States and 1964-1966 in Birmingham, UK.

There you have it. Strong evidence that this could actually be a Lincoln Cent struck on a wrong planchet !

STILL looking for more info? Check out these posts !

Our main website offers links to some great posts, educational and otherwise: https://minterrors.org

Questions about this website or about coins in general ?
Questions about this website or about coins in general ?

9 thoughts on “Lincoln Cent Struck on wrong planchet – A pair of 1945 Lincoln Cents on Ethiopian planchets.

  1. Thank you for the wonderful article about my coins (yes I’m the owner and purchased a Roosevelt dime error, by the way I am convinced the dime is a 1979 ;-).

    The Lincoln is in the hands of CAC for further conformation. I don’t think CAC does many mint errors, but I’m hopeful considering it’s perceived rareness or dare I say uniqueness or this find.

        1. Mark,
          It has been noted here inthe reply as well as added the link in this post. This post is climbing toward the top of the heap in google, so others will probably see it as well. I will pass the word around as best I can. Our next show will be back at Weyer’s Cave in April 2022.

    1. Thanks for the reply. Look your coins over close to the rim on both sides. see if there are any parts of the letters missing close to the rim. I mean it has to be pretty decent amount.
      More than likely those coins you have are fine. Back then, the mint manufactured it’s own planchets and I an sure they scrutinized them some, but not enough. Some wore rolled thin and this may well be the case for your coin. They are approximately .3 of a gram low, but it is not too terribly bad. You can take another copper penny from that same era, any wheat cent and check its width, and then lay them flat side by side to see the thickness. Yours might be a tad thinner. A thin or tapered planchet may might have a slighter weaker strike.

  2. MINTERRORS
    I had a 1934 penny that weigh 2.46 grams, the letters around rim and face n back seem all in tact. It might been struck on wrong stock and if that the case probally not worth much. If you need photos just ask it and hope to hear back from you.thank you

    1. Place the coin on a table next to another wheat or copper cent. See if they are the same height.
      The underweight could still be simply an underweight planchet.
      it could be a tapered planchet.
      It could have been on a foreign planchet. That takes time to research.
      The URL to see the nearly 70 page report is here: https://minterrornews.com/foreign_coinage_production_figures.pdf

      It could have been exposed to an acid based dip if the coin looks uneven, and part of the rim was eaten away.

      Take the coin to a local coin shop and see if they can investigate it.
      Or, Join the CONECA forum, which is free. Go to the CONECA Services Forum. Under the EXAMINATIONS forum, start a new post, complete with full clear, focused and no glare photos of the obverse and the reverse. Their fees are pretty cheap to attribute a coin. The choice is up to you.

    2. At the bottom of most posts is a public email. Please user that to email a clear, focused photo of the front and back. If you are able to crop the photo to reduce the background and focus on the coin, that would be good.

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