2012 Denali State Quarter – It’s not what you’d initially think

Look what this Denali state quarter initially looks like- then think again.

I have quite a few coins scattered in buckets at the location where we store things. On my last visit, I threw a bucket of these coins into my truck and headed home. Last night I was restless so I decided to dig into this bucket and look through a few of these coins. I remove a state quarter that some one had wrote “doubling on EPU”. It’s a 2012 Denali State Quarter to be exact.

I put the coin under the microscope and adjust it until I see the word “UNUM”. This is what I see.

A 2012 Denali State Quarter showing potential UNUM doubling.
A 2012 Denali State Quarter showing potential UNUM doubling.

Hummm that looks interesting, does it?

I decided to look around the rest of the coin to see what I could. Although in my mind, these sort of things have been debunked by many an expert as shelf doubling, and I will get back to that in a few.

I move the coin over to EPLUR and look at this area as well.

A 2012 Denali State Quarter showing potential E PLUR doubling.
A 2012 Denali State Quarter showing potential E PLUR doubling.

I see something around the PLU, especially the “P”. I decided to deep dive into this coin just for the fun of it and see what kind of photos I could get. Here is a closer photo of “PLU”.

A 2012 Denali State Quarter showing potential PLU doubling.
A 2012 Denali State Quarter showing potential PLU doubling.

I wanted to get a closer look at the “UNUM” again. It looked to be the area on the coin which this condition appears to be the best to see. Below is a photo of the “UNUM” area once again.

A 2012 Denali State Quarter showing potential UNUM doubling.
A 2012 Denali State Quarter showing potential UNUM doubling.

So, it almost ( the key word here) looks like a doubled die. But in the two photos above kind of contradict themselves. In the “PLU” photo, we see some sort of doubling to the north side of the letters. The “NUM” photo directly above, we see doubling at the southern part of the letters. Now thinking logically, this has two possibilities. Either we have a die that was impressed three times, having an impression, then a weaker one to the north and another to the south or, we have mechanical doubling.

Like I said, I dove deep into this coin. I wanted to see what I could all the way up to the maximum magnification I could get to see if there were any additional clues.

When I look at this “U”, all logic pointing towards a mechanical doubling seems to go out the window. I can see a doubling on the “U”. Look at what I labeled “Grain”. I can see lines across the middle part of the “U” and they do not wiggle or falter in any way. Does this prove it to be a doubled die? Or, are these lines simply “skid marks” ? Hold onto that skid mark comment for a few minutes.

A photo of the "U" at the largest Magnification possible.
A photo of the “U” at the largest Magnification possible.

NOTE: One thing I try not to do is move the lighting when I am taking a series of photos at a particular magnification. I do move the coin, and I try to place that coin at the same angle to the lighting as possible. This way a proper comparison can be done. Later if I need other photos, I move whatever I need to move and document the name of the file accordingly.

A photo of the "N" at the largest Magnification possible.
A photo of the “N” at the largest Magnification possible.

Ok, the “N” does not see as strong as the “U”. I do see grain lines on parts of the “N” but they are not as convincing as they were on the “U”. People normally would go back to the drawing board as logic is almost in a chaotic state at this point. Where’s the roller coaster sound effect when you need one?

The second “U” in “UNUM” goes back to the same condition at with the first “U”. It looks pretty convincing.

A photo of the second "U" at the largest Magnification possible.
A photo of the second “U” at the largest Magnification possible.

And lastly, the “M” in “UNUM”. The “M” looks a bit different. I see the doubling equal on both legs of the “M”. But, in the center “v” of the “M”, there is hardly any supposed doubling at all.

A photo of the "M" at the largest Magnification possible.
A photo of the “M” at the largest Magnification possible.

Ok, let’s let the coin out of the bag per se. With some, if not all of the State Quarters, the side that has the date on it the letters and numbers along that shelf like ring around the outter edge are “INCUSED“. What does incused mean for a coin like this? It means that the affect that is applied has the letters and numbers dug into the coin, vice them being raised. One of the neat things about the State Quarters is that they have both.

The side which depicts George Washington has raised letters and the side that depicts the Denali has incused letters.

Many coin professionals and experts believe that this doubling effect is machine doubling. As the letters of the die come in contact with the metal and puncture the surface, that initial force where the die meets planchet causes either the die or the planchet to shift ever so slightly. This would cause some of the letters and numbers to be a little more elongated than others. That is probably called “skidding” for most, then as pressure is applied it finally reaches its proper depth, and then the coin is ejected out to be bagged.

Also remember that this is a mechanical process. Dies are placed in machines by humans. The dies are carefully adjusted to make sure they operate correctly but, you cannot account for the tolerances in the machine behavior nor the inaccurate tolerances of the human eye and hand adjustments as the dies are being placed into the machines.

Typically – in the “Old Days”, a true Doubled Die more than likely will show split serifs or a notching when a doubled die was present. Typically, the old time doubled dies also had the doubling at or near the same height on both impressions of that working die.

This particular coin has the “doubling” almost exactly on top of each other. Also remember the newer way to make working dies is with a single squeeze technique, rather than the old time multiple impressions on a die.

In the case of the coin above, I strongly ( I think, LOL) believe that this is a case if “incused mechanical doubling”.

In this case, I had purchased three bags of Denali state quarters from the US Mint. I have these rolled up and in safe keeping. maybe on my next trip out to the safes, I may take a couple of rolls of the Denali’s out to see if I can locate a few more examples.

Things like this need to be approached logically. Some that are on the edge and might be discovery pieces should be sent in to an expert for examination.

This particular coin is interesting, but since it is incused where the effects have occurred, it’s a pretty good bet it’s mechanical doubling, but will be put back in a new plastic flip and placed in a box . It’s become one of those ” Let’s hold onto to this for a while” coins.

1904 Indian Head Cent Re-punched Date (RPD) attribution

Trying to identify this 1904 Indian Head Cent Re-punched Date (RPD)

About a year ago, I bought a Indian Head Cent Roll from a customer. My initial motive behind the purchase was to place them in 2×2 cardboard flips and sell them in the $1.00 bargain bin. Most of these had the appearance to grade Good to Fine, with the majority in the G-4 range. When I got home, I set the roll down by the microscope and pretty much forgot about them for about a month. Then one day when I had some time, I started digging through the roll looking for anything Interesting. I did manage to pull out three decent Indian Re-punched dates. I sent those off to ANACS and they came back confirmed as I thought they would.

Some of these Indians, Man, they had so much crud on them that the only option I had was to try and soak them in boiling water. I Let them sit for 15 minutes and then took a slightly moist paper towel to them. That got about 10-20% of the gunk off and still it wasn’t enough. So I repeated the process but in a different way. I took a sturdy plastic container and lined it with tin foil on the bottom. I placed the coins onto the tin foil at the bottom of the container with the worse side up. I sprinkled a large amount of baking soda on top of all the Indian Cents. With another batch of boiling water, I covered the coins with water about 3 inches deep.

Immediately a cleansing action started, the bubbling was really violent and I noticed a slightly discolored Steam. It stunk, I quickly took the experiment outside on the deck and placed it on the railing and went back inside. I put everything away and returned outside to see how the experiment was coming. After the water had cooled to near lukewarm, I decided to rinse the coins off and paper towel dry them off. About 60% or more of the material came off, and I could see a lot more details on the coins than before.

I looked through all of the Indians, and one of the last ones I looked at, I simply chuckled. Here was a 1904 Indian that looks like it is a Re-punched Date. In the past I have tried to photograph this 1904 Indian Cent but I could NOT get the “04” to show the Re-punched Date.

Tonight I got lucky with the lighting and managed to take these photographs.

The Re-punched Date of the 1904 Indian Cent

The 1904 Indian went from almost unreadable to a better looking Indian Cent. It is not in the best shape, but I was surprised to see how clear the re-punched date stood out. This will be one that I will look for when I am visiting the handful of auction houses I frequent.

1904 Indian Cent Obverse with a Reunched Date. What the coin looks like after the Baking Soda Bath.
1904 Indian Cent Obverse with a Reunched Date. What the coin looks like after the Baking Soda Bath.
1904 Indian Cent Reverse with a Reunched Date. What the coin looks like after the Baking Soda Bath.
1904 Indian Cent Reverse with a Reunched Date. What the coin looks like after the Baking Soda Bath.

For the “1”, I believe I can see a second portion of the left top portion of the foot of the “1”, I also see a faint line which runs from the base of that foot up to the flag of the “1” .

For the “9”, at the bottom of the “9” and continuing to the outer right hand edge is some relatively bold impression of the lesser punching.

The "19" of the 1904 Indian Cent with a Re-punched Date. The Arrows indicate where the re-punching is evident.
The “19” of the 1904 Indian Cent with a Re-punched Date. The Arrows indicate where the re-punching is evident.

The “0” seems to be the least affected in the Re-punched date. There is only a slight impression lby the weaker punching to the bottom right hand side. The most impressive digit of the Re-punching is the “4”. The photo shows a second impression from the tail crossbar of the “4” all the way to the top of the “4” . If you look closely at the top of this “4”, something weird is going on. I can clearly see a lower flat top style “4”. The top impression of the “4” at the very top, shows a shorter “4” and the peak is at an angle, probably close to 45 to 60 degrees.

The "04" of the 1904 Indian Cent with a Re-punched Date. The Arrows indicate where the re-punching is evident.
The “04” of the 1904 Indian Cent with a Re-punched Date. The Arrows indicate where the re-punching is evident.

Now will come the fun part. I attempted to attribute this coin prior to posting the photos and I have not yet found a match for this Re-punched Indian cent from 1904. I am in no hurry, eventually I will find a match.

1833 Shield Nickel Re-Punched Date (RPD) FS-311

1883 RPD showing a secondary impression of the date

I was on a popular Auction House looking through the merchandise when a PCGS slabbed Shield Nickel was on the list. I decided to take a second look at the coin. The auction house photos were pretty bad. I managed to plug in the certification number to find out that this coin was purchased from another auction house in the Spring of 2020.

The 2nd auction house photos were a bit more clear and I decided to purchase the coin even if PCGS says it was cleaned. My intent for this coin is to use it as a conversation piece at some of he upcoming shows.

When the coin arrived, I took it to the microscope. I am going to take photographs with a Canon Rebel T3i and a special lens that is inserted into the eyepiece. Here is the result of the repunched date on the 1833 Shield Nickel:

A close up of the Repunched Date on a 1883 Shield Nickel. This shows the 18 along with the weaker 1 between primary 18
A close up of the Repunched Date on a 1883 Shield Nickel. This shows the 18 along with the weaker 1 between primary 18
A close up of the Repunched Date on a 1883 Shield Nickel. This shows the 83. Notice the additional punching signs within the 8.
A close up of the Repunched Date on a 1883 Shield Nickel. This shows the 83. Notice the additional punching signs within the 8. The “3” just looks WEIRD. It looks like there are scribbles within the center of the “3”.

Additional photos of the 1833 Shield Nickel with a Repunched Date (RPD)

The Microscope I own is Trinocular meaning it has the potential for 3 eye pieces. The 3rd eyepiece is where a special microscope camera resides. It’s a 14MP camera and through some software it is ported to my PC. I’ll upload a few photos of the date from this 14MP microscope camera below.

The extra base of a “1” is evident in between the primary 1 and 8. I think I see something at the toppart of the “8” as well. The pick up point (PUP) for this coin is the weaker “1” located between the predominant “1” and “8” in the photo below.

the 18 from a 1883 Shield Nickel. This photo was taken from a 14MP microscope camera
The 18 from a 1883 Shield Nickel. This photo was taken from a 14MP microscope camera

I then decided to shift one number at a time. I wanted to compare the “88” to see if there was the same sort of issue at the top of both “8’s” and I can clearly see that there is.

The 88 from a 1883 Shield Nickel. This photo was taken from a 14MP microscope camera
The 88 from a 1883 Shield Nickel. This photo was taken from a 14MP microscope camera

The last two numbers “83” also look intriguing. You can almost see that dash of a line in both the “8” and the “3”. This could be the top of the “original” date punching. I have taken the the time to take a full date photo and match up the lower 1 to see if it would make sense to see parts of the original date within the predominate date punching. To me it looked like a winner.

The 83 from a 1883 Shield Nickel. This photo was taken from a 14MP microscope camera
The 83 from a 1883 Shield Nickel. This photo was taken from a 14MP microscope camera

This will offer a few hours of conversation at the next show we plan on attending. The 1883 Shield Nickels with Re-Punched Dates are not that expensive when compared to the 1833 Shield Nickels with the 1883 over 2 over date.

Interested in seeing this 1883 Shiled Nickel with a re-punched date in person? We are looking forward to attending the VNA coin convention in Fredericksburg in September. We set up on Thursday the 24th of September in Fredericksburg, VA at the Fredericksburg Convention Center off Carl D Silver Parkway. For more information about the show and whether it will be allowed through this COVID pandemic, please visit www.vnaonline.org

1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7), Red

A nice 1899 Re-punched Date and a nice coin as well.

Every once in a while, I manage to look through many auction houses to see if something appeals to me. I recently had a handful of Indian Cents come back slabbed and attributed as I self attributed them myself. I had a much lower grade of this 1899 RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7) and although it was in a lower grade I could clearly see the Re-punched date. As a matter of fact, I believe the lower graded coin has a bit more separation than this currently unslabbed version I am examining now.

Auction house photos of 1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7) not the best

The Auction House photos of the 1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7) were not the best. I was pretty sure I could see the doubling below the “8” . The auction photos showed something within the hooks of the “9’s” but I was not certain it was doubled.

I decided to give it a shot. Here are the photos I took of this 1899 Indian cent Re-punched date, FS-301, Snow-1, (011-7d).

1899 Indian Cent 1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7)
1899 Indian Cent 1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7)
1899 Indian Cent 1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7) Reverse
1899 Indian Cent 1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7) Reverse

Looking at the 1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7) a little closer

I took the coin to the microscope to attribute it and make absolutely sure it is what it is. There were just two re-punched dates that year as far as I know, at least two that are recognized by the major grading companies. Have a look at the date and see if this is a 1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7).

1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7) 18XX, x4
1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7) 18XX, x4
1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7) xx99, x4
1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7) xx99, x4

Looks pretty convincing to me. It looks better under the scope than in the full coin photo since the cooper red color seems to make the RPD blend in with the rest of the coin.

Looking at Population and Prices.

For the 1899 Indian Cent RPD FS-301 S-1 (011.7) :

PCGS has this valued at $275.00 in MS-63 and $400.00 in MS-64.

PCGS has the population of this coin as:

Two (2) – One in MS-64 and one in MS-65

NGC on the other hand, does not list the FS-301, but lists FS-302.

For Sale at the VNA

My plan is to have the coin slabbed and the attribution authenticated. You will have until Sunday morning at the VNA convention in Fredericksburg VA to take it off my hands. The VNA convention in Virginia happens near the end of September. You can find us at the front tables all the way to the left as you come in the front door.